By Wayne White / Pictures / 0 Comments

This sycamore tree is being injected with fungicide for the treatment of Sycamore Anthracnose. There are 92 sycamore trees on this site, all infected to some degree with this chronic disease. In addition, the trees are being soil treated with a special mix of fertilizer and organic products to increase their health. If you have similar problems with your sycamore tree, please contact me! There is a treatment available to fix this problem.

By Wayne White / Pictures / 0 Comments

The “witches’ broom” growth characteristics are even more pronounced in this picture. The repeated leaf and twig infection causes them to drop from the tree. When this is repeated year after year, this causes severe growth deformity. The tree needs to rid itself of this repeated infection, but needs help to do it. Over a few years of proper treatment and fertilization, sycamore trees can recover from this disease. The key is to catch it before the decline gets too bad.

By Wayne White / Pictures / 0 Comments

Here is “witches’ broom” that is very simple to spot. The advanced distorted growth is caused by the Anthracnose disease. Leaves and twigs frequently fall during the late spring, and occasionally all season, but then the tree re-leafs. The overall health of the tree suffers from this, and if repeated year after year, could subject the tree to severe decline.

By Wayne White / Pictures / 0 Comments

A close-up of this sycamore tree shows the “witches’ broom” growth characteristics that are associated with Anthracnose. This is caused by the repeated death of small, new branches as they get infected each spring and die. A new sprout grows out from a location and dies, which leads to a new sprout growing out of the same location and also dying. This occurrence repeats several times, and causes the dead shoots to look like a broom.

By Wayne White / Pictures / 0 Comments

This is one of the sycamore trees showing minor Anthracnose problems. There is some stunting of growth, and it is less healthy looking than the first tree with some die-back and infected twigs. It may be difficult to see, but this sycamore tree has the tell-tale signs of “witches’ broom.”

By Wayne White / Pictures / 0 Comments

Sycamore Tree - vs Anthracnose This photo was taken in the Fall of 2010. This shows a healthy sycamore tree on the property adjacent to the one on which I treated 92 sycamore trees struggling from a disease called Sycamore Anthracnose. The goal of the treatment program is to improve all of the sycamore trees on the affected site so that they eventually look just like this healthy one.